Beethoven and cultural-diversity advocate Daniel Barenboim.

Hot on the heels of Stewart Goodyear’s Saturday sonata marathon, Universal Music Canada is using one of our time’s most prominent Beethoven advocates, Daniel Barenboim, as an excuse to call on Toronto’s musicians — professional and amateur alike — to participate in an evening of music by Beethoven at Heliconian Hall.

Anyone with a favourite piece of Beethoven’s — or an arrangement — they would like to perform can submit the request here. The deadline for submissions is 11:59 p.m. on June 14. The concert, scheduled for Friday, June 22, will be streamed live starting at 7 p.m., extending its audience well beyond the cozy confines of the Yorkville landmark.

This is probably as close as one can get to a pop-up classical concert. This is, in itself, a brilliant idea.

All of this is to draw attention to Beethoven for All, a 5-CD recording for Universal’s Decca label of all nine Beethoven symphonies by conductor Daniel Barenboim and his cultural bridge-building East-Western Divan Orchestra. The box set is due for release on June 19. (Details here.)

Universal and Decca have partnered with Classical 96FM, Atelier Grigorian and Pape Village music school Lippert Music Centre to present the Toronto concert.

Names submitted online are entered into a contest to win a 15-CD Beethoven for All deluxe box set that includes Beethoven’s nine symphonies, five piano concertos and 32 piano sonatas. There is also a chance to win a pair of tickets to “a Toronto area Beethoven Concert during the 2012/13 concert season.”

Here’s a promotional video that highlights the wonderful work done by Barenboim and his orchestra:

John Terauds

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8 Responses to Daniel Barenboim’s label calls Toronto Beethoven fans for pop-up concert at Heliconian Hall

  1. Mervon says:

    Sounds like a marketing stunt to me!

    • John Terauds John Terauds says:

      It totally is, but it involves people making music, which is why I think it’s a brilliant idea.

    • mgaminc says:

      These are all marketing stunts. Wasn’t the Goodyear marathon a marketing stunt. At the end of how many hours he played some of the deepest most meaningful music ever written. How could he have given it the attention it so deserves. It is obvious that we are all searching for ways to bring the music we love to the public. My only request is that we keep the music making real and at the centre of all of our efforts.

      • Stewart Goodyear says:

        My dear friend, I wish you would have given me the courtesy of attending my whole Beethoven marathon so that your comments would be from a position of truth and knowledge.

        • mgaminc says:

          I was not commenting on the your particular performance. Rather I was questioning the idea of playing so many great works one after the other and how any human can have the concentration to do that. I have heard you perform at Koerner Hall and know that you are an exceptionally find artist. That is not in question.

      • HC says:

        From someone who was there, the second half of part 3 (i.e. sonatas 30-32) was absolutely transcendent. Nothing was rushed and no detail or nuance passed over. I believe Mr. Goodyear gave this emotionally and intellectually complex music music his full attention, which was only sharpened as the day progressed.

        If these are stunts, then the world of classical music needs a lot more of them.

  2. I’m enjoying the blog, and the dialogue….NB:
    Barenboim’s name is misspelled in the headline (not the body) of the document